good
good:

The Good Gap: Why Do Chinese Consumers Care More About Responsible Business Than Americans?
Despite—or perhaps because of—the relative immaturity of their economies, people in China, Brazil, and India expect companies to do more good than people in the United States and Europe. A new survey from Edelman Public Relations, a global communications agency, examines how consumers relate to companies and brands around social purpose, and how those relationships affect their decisions to purchase products and services. 
Learn more about the gap at GOOD.is

…GOOD gives the Edelman Goodpurpose study some love. (Thanks, guys!)

good:

The Good Gap: Why Do Chinese Consumers Care More About Responsible Business Than Americans?

Despite—or perhaps because of—the relative immaturity of their economies, people in China, Brazil, and India expect companies to do more good than people in the United States and Europe. A new survey from Edelman Public Relations, a global communications agency, examines how consumers relate to companies and brands around social purpose, and how those relationships affect their decisions to purchase products and services. 

Learn more about the gap at GOOD.is

…GOOD gives the Edelman Goodpurpose study some love. (Thanks, guys!)

thedailywhat
thedailywhat:

Sage Advice of the Day: Henry Rollins, the relentlessly outspoken hardcore music icon — the Black Flag bearer of modern punk, if you will — recently participated in a “Letters to a Young American” project. What follows is an excerpt from Part 1 and Part 2.

“You’ll find in your life that sometimes your great ambitions will be momentarily stymied, thwarted, marginalized by those who were perhaps luckier; come from money; had more doors opened; where college was a given, not a student loan; it was something that dad paid for; where an ease and confidence in life was almost a birthright. Where for you, it was a very hard climb. … That happens all the time.
Just because you come from nothing, you must not let that be something that holds you back.”

Poignant, and more relevant than ever.
[death+taxes]

Yes.

thedailywhat:

Sage Advice of the Day: Henry Rollins, the relentlessly outspoken hardcore music icon — the Black Flag bearer of modern punk, if you will — recently participated in a “Letters to a Young American” project. What follows is an excerpt from Part 1 and Part 2.

“You’ll find in your life that sometimes your great ambitions will be momentarily stymied, thwarted, marginalized by those who were perhaps luckier; come from money; had more doors opened; where college was a given, not a student loan; it was something that dad paid for; where an ease and confidence in life was almost a birthright. Where for you, it was a very hard climb. … That happens all the time.

Just because you come from nothing, you must not let that be something that holds you back.”

Poignant, and more relevant than ever.

[death+taxes]

Yes.

Not to put too fine a point on it, but the people in charge at the Augusta National Golf Club, a private club, can have whatever rules they want and they’re entitled to them. Personally, were I Rometty, I would fail to care if they didn’t invite me. I would also fail to see why IBM should remain a sponsor of a private club with discriminatory policies that don’t reflect IBM’s commendable commitments to global diversity or workplace parity. Translation: I’d be telling them to shove it either way. Most CEOs would agree that there are better things than sexism and classism to invest the resources of the people they lead in. And also, judging by this latest, I am sure that Augusta National has no idea how ridiculous they are, which is sad and their members should be completely embarrassed and mortified, and if they’re not, well, that says something pretty embarrassing about them, too, but I’m not getting bent about it. There are plenty of organizations and clubs that DO want my participation that aren’t violently slithering towards total irrelevancy.

good

Dear Sir:

I like words. I like fat buttery words, such as ooze, turpitude, glutinous, toady. I like solemn, angular, creaky words, such as straitlaced, cantankerous, pecunious, valedictory. I like spurious, black-is-white words, such as mortician, liquidate, tonsorial, demi-monde. I like suave “V” words, such as Svengali, svelte, bravura, verve. I like crunchy, brittle, crackly words, such as splinter, grapple, jostle, crusty. I like sullen, crabbed, scowling words, such as skulk, glower, scabby, churl. I like Oh-Heavens, my-gracious, land’s-sake words, such as tricksy, tucker, genteel, horrid. I like elegant, flowery words, such as estivate, peregrinate, elysium, halcyon. I like wormy, squirmy, mealy words, such as crawl, blubber, squeal, drip. I like sniggly, chuckling words, such as cowlick, gurgle, bubble and burp.

I like the word screenwriter better than copywriter, so I decided to quit my job in a New York advertising agency and try my luck in Hollywood, but before taking the plunge I went to Europe for a year of study, contemplation and horsing around.

I have just returned and I still like words.

May I have a few with you?

Robert Pirosh
385 Madison Avenue
Room 610
New York
Eldorado 5-6024

My new favorite job application letter, from 1934. He ended up winning an Oscar for screenwriting!

(via Letters of Note)

We like words too.

(via good)